Kim Kardashian Did Not ‘Break the Internet’. And Good Riddance!

Kim Kardashian’s latest mindless venture is just offensive. For those who aren’t aware (and good for you), earlier this week, Paper Magazine launched their cover of a fully nude, oiled up, and smug Kardashian. Their aim was to “break the internet.” While collective scepticism over the authenticity of the shots immediately arose (Kardashian’s butt size, for instance), according to the Wall Street Journal, the comet touch down of The Rosetta, a European aircraft, ignited over 170,000 more tweets than the “wow” intending Kardashian nudie spread.

This small but pointed social media statistic makes us SheRa girls quietly smile on the inside. Maybe more people are finally reaching our position of total disinterest in the likes of such seemly vapid, vein, and relentless reality TV celebrities like Kardashian. Female celebrities who insist on perpetuating harmful and archaic stereotypes. Seriously, what does she stand for? In what way does she contribute to culture or utilize her celebrity profile and subsequent ‘voice’ to influence positive change? And what kind of role model does she provide for younger women and girls? Sure, Kim Kardashian can be perceived as an embodiment of the “fuller figured woman.” But I don’t really buy that. Most images of her are manipulated and her excessive Narcissus complex supersedes any kind of potential authenticity. What purpose does she serve if not merely to remind the rest of us of the dangers of gluttony, extorted ego, and an apparent tunnel focus on fame and fortune?

Kim-Kardashian-paper

Image source: entretenimiento.starmedia.com

This recent photo shoot for Paper has revealed (if we weren’t already well aware of the fact) that the wife of Kanye West whose fame first arose after a leaked sex tape has only one interest: to obtain and/or maintain acute public attention, regardless of the social, cultural, or political implications of whatever the stunt she just pulled are.

But enough about such banality. Let’s now focus our attentions to more substantial icons and pursuits. Please. 

Feature image sourced from adweek.com

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